Conferences for women in STEM in 2019

Conferences for women in STEM or women in tech are gaining popularity year over year, especially in North America. In a male-dominated industry, they answer a need for networking with like-minded women and for exchanging work experience with them.  

Check out or list of the most important conferences for women in STEM around the world in 2019. Read More

Noble Prize Award Ceremony

Today 10 December 2018 the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony is taking place in Stockholm, Sweden. Among the 210 persons having received the price in physics, only three have been women. The last one was Donna Strickland who this year was awarded the prize together with Arthur Ashkin, Gérard Mourou for their research on high-intensity ultra short optical pulses.

Among the 181 persons receiving the prize in chemistry, five have been women. This year Frances Arnold was one of the three receivers of the price for her work on the directed evolution of enzymes. Read More

Women in STEM: A story of Marjorie Rojas Rincón

Marjorie Rojas Rincón is a Colombian electronic engineer, co-founder of Plusinn and a member of Smart Building Alliance, living and working in Switzerland. Engineering has been her dream job since she was little and she followed her passion and talent. In the interview, Marjorie has told us about her background, successes, challenges she has overcome and support she has got from her family and coworkers. Read More

Women in STEM: Success stories and factors behind them

Many women in STEM face several challenges every day. Although it’s more and more common to hear about successful women in STEM and 2018 Nobel Prize winners (Frances Arnold (Chemistry) and Donna Strickland (Physics)) are great examples of success stories, there’s still a long way to go.

There are some common factors of women who have succeeded in STEM, and this article will take a closer look at them. Read More

Women in STEM: A story of Anu Ylänen

When we started the series of interviews with women in STEM, our goal was to show how different and exciting their paths can be. We’ve talked to a VR filmmaker, database administrator, scientist, software engineer working at CERN and other successful women from around the world. Today we are happy to publish our interview with Anu Ylänen from the startup environment. Anu, who comes from Finland, is a product specialist working at Batmaid in Lausanne, Switzerland. Read More

Women in STEM: A story of Gladys Maina

Gladys Maina is a successful woman in STEM. She offers mentorship programs for high school students who would like to join the STEM field as their chosen career. As a seasoned moderator and speaker, she volunteers for speaking engagements, panel moderation and discussions with a bias in diversity, inclusion and equality in technology.

She has agreed to talk to us about her career path, inspirations and ideas on how to improve the situation of women in STEM. Read More

Women in STEM: A story of Adriana L. Romero-Olivares

Did you have a turning point in your career?
Yes, a year into my PhD program I realized that my career as a scientist was not only about me but also about underrepresented groups in our society. I vowed to have a career in sciences and serve these communities throughout my career. Since I am not yet in a position of power, I do what I can, mostly volunteering in groups that advocate for the advancement of women in society (e.g. AAUW).

What do you think is one example of one way you have enjoyed your human rights, in learning or at work?
The fact that I have a PhD in the sciences is a clear example. So many women around the world don’t have this simple and one of the most basic and essential human rights: access to education. Read More

Women in STEM: A story of Milana Stojadinov

We’ve interviewed several successful women from around the world to show that women in STEM have many different stories, career paths and points of view. Milana Stojadinov, Software Engineer from Serbia, working at Rendered Text, is one of them.

Why have you decided to pursue a career in this field? What was your inspiration?
From the early days, my attention was occupied by puzzles and the purpose of everyday objects. Even today, I catch myself breaking a thing apart, just to be able to find how it works and then to fix it back. That’s pretty much my story: I ask a question and then develop an answer for it. It neither solved any world’s problem nor gave me the Fields medal, but it focuses my life. This bit of skepticism, naturally, guided me to study pure mathematics. Read More